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Bearded Henry Crandell
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1795 History of HENRY CRANDELL – Biographies – At 219 years old, he really must be an old dude, aye?
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HENRY CRANDELL was born in the town of Schettacoke, Rensselaer County, N.Y., Sept. 22, 1795. He is a son of Eber Crandell, who was a native of the town of Cold Spring, Sutchess County, N.Y., having been born there in the year 1755, the latter’s father having lived and died there. His father, James Crandell was of English ancestry, settling on Long Island before the dawn of the seventeenth century. Eber Crandell, above mentioned , removed from Schettacoke to Argyle, Washington C., this State, when Henry was an infant, and settled there as a farmer; twelve years thereafter removing to Scipio, Cayuga Co., N.Y., where he remained a few years and then sold his farm and came to the town of Ulysses, now in Tompkins County, and from thence to the part of Catharine now included in Veteran, about 1832, and there remained until his death, which occurred while on a visit to Ann Arbor, Mich., when upwards of eighty years of age. Henry Crandell at an early day served a seven years’ apprenticeship to the carpenter and joiner trade, which he has followed, in connection with agricultural pursuits, most of his life.

On the 18th of October, 1816, he was married to Eliza, daughter of Colonel Charles Hill, of Madison Co., N.Y., the result of this union having been five children, viz: Charles, Humphrey, Diana, Susan and Amos Wilson, the latter alone surviving, the third and forth named having died in infancy. Mr. Crandell removed from Ulysses to Veteran with his family in the year 1827, having been induced to emigrate by the prospect of the construction of the Chemung Canal, the progress of which he had been watching for some three years. While in Ulysses he, in company with his brother, purchased a mill property for $6000, paying one-half down and mortgaging the property for the balance. A freshet washed away the dam and carried with it most of the mill stock, in consequence of which the mortgage was foreclosed, leaving Mr. Crandall $500 in debt. By persevering industry and the strictest economy he paid this all up in five years; and that, too, while working at one dollar a day, he in the meanwhile supporting his family.

Politically, he came on the stage in old Whig time, and on the formation of the Republican party he adopted their platform, and has ever stood firm to its principles. He has held the various town offices from supervisor down. He has never affiliated with any religious denomination, although he has been associated more particularly with the Society of Friends, of which his wife was an exemplary member, and widely known as “Aunt Eliza.” She was a most estimable lady, of fine education, a good discourser, and of great social worth. She died in 1867, in the sixty-eighth year of her age, and fifty-first of her marriage. Mr. Crandell is now in his eighty-fourth year, and resides with his son, Amos W. He is well preserved and possesses all his faculties, his eyesight alone being somewhat impaired. The writer of this sketch found him in the field husking corn in the fall of 1878.

Among the public works with which he was identified mechanically were the New York Central Railroad from Rochester to Auburn, the Chemung Canal, and the Northern Central Railway (formerly the Chemung Railroad) from Watkins to Elmira.

The life and character of the gentleman of whom we have written presents many incidents and traits worthy to be followed, and offers a bright example of what a good citizen ought to be. 
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Gee, what a macho dude, aye? €;=)
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No relation to Wrecks Crandell has been brought to our attention. Wreally.

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